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The "Rights of Englishmen" Series

This is a list of the posts from my "Rights of Englishmen" series, as well as some others: - The Rights of Englishmen Part 1:...

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Science Fiction and "Feminine Energy."

It's been suggested I watch the newest Battlestar Galactica series.  It's filled with embedded encouragements for feminists.  And the tense scenes--such as space battles--are usually taken over with New Age world music.  When I hear New Age world music, I imagine a bunch of Amazon warrior chicks racing through a jungle to fight a pig.  So I found it very strange to be hearing this style of music as the audio of choice for space battles.

Meh.  The first two pilot episodes were okay, however.  I suppose I can skip over the filler episodes and enjoy the better-written episodes.  There is no need to waste an hour watching an episode in which the characters try to confront some sort of tragedy from their past.  Perhaps feminists enjoy that sort of thing.  I find it boring.  I will try to continue watching this series to its completion.

Before this, I whittled my way through Star Trek Voyager.  It's a hilarious show in many respects.  Every time I saw the Voyager spacecraft fly across the screen, I could see in my mind a high heel gliding through space.  Just about every man on that program was metrosexual to some degree, and could wear a pink John Mayer-styled shirt without flinching.  But I admired the Star Trek canon up until that point, and I was wanting some sort of closure on what happened in Roddenberry's universe.  It's a sedate and dusty universe, by the way.

What is it that compels science fiction writers that there needs to be feminine energy in their shows?  Perhaps they just watched Aliens one day and said: "Look at Ripley fight the hive queen.  That is how science fiction should be.  There should always be a strong female protagonist in every science fiction feature."  And perhaps they have not been able to think outside of the box ever since.

Or maybe the sci-fi world has merely been inundated with liberals and pro-feminists for decades.  This would explain why most straight men have no interest in sci-fi outside of Halo.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

My presence at Fisheaters and Cathinfo

Wow.  That's an end, I suppose.  I've decided to restrain much, if not all participation on Cathinfo.com.  Or at least, that is what I said to myself tonight.  I said bye to my opponents and will hopefully be able to refrain from saying anything further, leaving them with the last word, whatever that shall be.

I have not posted on Fisheaters since June, when a matter about accepting a transsexual drove most everyone off the forum.  I'm not sure I feel comfortable posting there ever again, either.  Seems they have a lot of new people there these days, and it still seems to remain a sort of pseudo-gay-friendly "wink, wink, nod, nod" Catholic forum.

But at Cathinfo, what happened?  Basically, I was defending an online colleague named ggreg against character assassinations.  I was told by most folks that I was blind and could not see how evil ggreg was.  Then, today, it was revealed that someone--most likely a poster on Cathinfo--got the bright idea of hacking into his LinkedIn account and posting some of ggreg's most incendiary opinions.  This was an attack on ggreg's livelihood.  Yet, there was not a flinch from the angry "internet mob," and potent attacks continued in the thread.

To me, the situation reeked of hypocrisy.   Greg's humor is salty, but I don't think he deserved the treatment he's received at Cathinfo.

Anyway, I've thrown in the towel there.  I'm not sure I could happily post there anymore, as it's been made clear that I'm out of touch there and am not welcome.

Unlike Vox Day, who managed to hang around in the SFWA until he was unfairly booted out, I see no purpose for maintaining a presence with the posters of Cathinfo.

In fairness to the Cathinfo moderator, Matthew, I've usually considered him to do a bang-up job, and I've often enjoyed his posts.  He seems a likeable guy and worthy of knowing in real life.

In this 5-year experience on forums, I have only witnessed trends within the Catholic Traditional Movement.  But I haven't made any solid connections with any of these forum participants.  I've learned a few interesting tangents of Catholic history and absorbed some annotative trivia.

I'm unsure if I will continue with forum participation.